Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Fantasy Characters

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday is a character freebie, so we decided to delve into one of our favorite genres: fantasy! Thanks to That Artsy Reader Girl for the prompt. 


Pete’s Top Five

Thomas Senlin from The Books of Babel by Josiah Bancroft

He is absolutely flawed and often fails to think of others—but he learns, and watching him stumble along the way is entertaining. 

Dalinar Kholin from The Stormlight ArchiveI By Brandon Sanderson

The ultimate fantasy dad. So he has a dark past—but he has changed so much since his younger self, and he turned into one of my favorite heroes from just about anything. 

Raoden from Elantris by Brandon Sanderson

Irrational optimism in the face of miserable conditions—Raoden is a shining light in the center of a world of suffering. He’s fantastic. 

Samwise Gamgee from The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

There are many legendary best friends in fantasy—but Sam stands above the rest, and there is quite literally no way Middle-earth could have been saved without him. 

Hester Shaw from The Mortal Engines Quartet by Philip Reeve

Another flawed character—one who has been hurt by greedy people in a dangerous world. But inside her is someone caring, even if she often struggles to show others kindness.


Indiana’s Top Five

Coraline from Neil Gaiman’s novel 

I love her character arc and I really identified with her throughout the entire book. 

Wit from The Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson 

As the name would imply, Wit is entertaining and wise. However, the most interesting aspect of Wit is that he’ll pop up at the most unexpected times and in the most unexpected places throughout Sanderson’s books. 

Luna Lovegood from Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling 

She’s probably the most whimsical character in the entire series, which is saying something. 

Richard Mayhew from Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman 

Though he spends most of the book having what I would consider a rough time, Richard handled it all remarkably well. 

Agatha from The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani 

Starting out as an intentional outcast, Agatha grows quite a lot and eventually ends up really re-shaping her world.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: